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Strengthen Your Culture By Planning For Change

by Jonathan Jones

Perhaps, Ben Franklin spoke the wisest words: “Change is the only constant in life. One’s ability to adapt to those changes will determine your success in life.” How successful is your company at change? Do your employees adapt or are they resistant?

The pace of change has accelerated in the last few years. Whether it’s rules and regulations, technological advancements, consumer expectations, marketing tactics, or shifts in recruitment and leadership, adapting to the constant stream of new information has become today’s standard.

What strategy will strengthen your organization’s culture to be adaptable to change?

As opposed to being a singular occurrence, change is a continuous process. There are five phases to effective change management, as outlined by Harvard Business School:

1. Prepare the organization for change.
2. Craft a vision and plan for change.
3. Implement changes.
4. Embed changes within company culture and practices.
5. Review progress and analyze results.

Employee readiness is essential to the success of any organizational transition. Begin by discussing the motivations and the why for the decision to make a change. Involve your employees by creating an engaging brainstorming session during which everyone on the team can provide their thoughts and suggestions.

Often the best way to get a desired result is to ask the individuals performing the work to devise a solution. Throughout the change process, keep lines of communication open and frequent with team members. Doing so will allow them to feel invested in the outcome.

When employees are included in decision making and empowered to shape the company’s future direction, their position shifts from opposition to adaptability, which is essential for the future.

Jonathan Jones (Jonathan.jones@vistagechair.com or 314-608-0783) is a CEO peer group chair/coach for Vistage International.
Submitted 1 years 52 days ago
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Categories: categoryCulturecentric Leadership
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